Stock control procedure

Eleven points of stock control procedure:

  1. At a yearly interval, the Contractor undertakes to conduct one free periodic inventory control within every warehouse used by the Ordering Person. The control has to include all the goods of the Ordering Person.
  2. The Ordering Person agrees for at least 4 days of warehouse downtime for the purpose of periodic inventory control. In justified cases the period may be extended.
  3. Each time the date and duration of the periodic inventory control is agreed upon by the Contractor and the Ordering Person.
  4. In the yearly period, the Contractor may perform (at its sole discretion) any amount of partial inventory controls on the goods of the Ordering Person, provided that it does not cause any decrease in daily efficiency.
  5. In the yearly period, the Contractor may commission one additionally paid full inventory control (similarly to the periodic inventory control described in section 1) or a partial inventory control (single product) once a week. The dates and conditions of such inventory controls will be agreed upon with the Contractor who may, depending on the scope of control, order the stopping of the regular operations of the warehouse.
  6. Discrepancies in the stock may arise as part of every inventory control, and they will be corrected immediately after the inventory control procedure has been finished. Correcting the discrepancies does not require the approval of the Ordering Person.
  7. The Contractor shall inform the Ordering Person by email (sent to the specified email address) about every stock adjustment.
  8. After finishing the inventory control procedure, the Contractor will make a list of all stock adjustments and a CSV file containing the current stock of all goods available to the Ordering Person no later than on the following working day.
  9. Each corrected item has to contain the description of the possible cause of the discrepancy, created according to the Contractor’s best knowledge.
    • “Destruction” – selected when the lack in stock resulted from complete destruction of the product due to the Contractor’s fault.
    • “Acceptance of delivery error” – selected when the analysis conducted by the Contractor shows that the most probable cause of the discrepancy was incorrect acceptance of delivery (failure to identify the error during the acceptance of delivery)
    • “Release error” – selected when the analysis conducted by the Contractor shows that the most probable cause of the discrepancy was incorrect release of goods conducted by the Contractor.
    • “Return error” – selected when the analysis conducted by the Contractor shows that the most probable cause of the discrepancy was incorrect acceptance of return conducted by the Contractor.
    • “Lost” – selected in the event of partial inventory controls if unexplained discrepancies were found during the partial inventory control of the goods of the Ordering Person. Such discrepancies in the stock of a given product should be explained during further partial inventory controls or, at the latest, during the closest periodic inventory control. If, at the latest during the closest periodic inventory control, individual stock adjustments marked as “Lost” are not explained, they must be assigned a different status. Such a stock adjustment does not impose any changes related to book-keeping, it only means that the goods are unavailable for release until the matter has been resolved.
    • “Found” – selected in the event of partial inventory controls if unexplained discrepancies were found during the partial inventory control of the goods of the Ordering Person. Such discrepancies in the stock of a given product should be explained during further partial inventory controls or, at the latest, during the closest periodic inventory control. If, at the latest during the closest periodic inventory control, individual stock adjustments marked as “Found” are not explained, they must be assigned a different status.
  10. To allow the Ordering Person to analyse the possible causes of stock adjustments on his/her own, the Contractor makes the “Goods History” view available to the Ordering Person. The view presents all warehouse operations related to a certain goods item in chronological order (acceptance of deliveries, acceptance of returns, goods release, and stock corrections), and makes it possible to export this to a CSV file.
  11. At the end of each inventory control, the Contractor provides the Ordering Person with an inventory report which contains a list of all stock adjustments. The Ordering Person uses the report to create, by use of his/her own means, necessary value and accounting adjustments related to the stock.